Insulin

Insulin supports cell proliferation and viability

Insulin in Cell Culture

Insulin is a critical component in most serum-free media formulations. Insulin supports cell growth and regulates the cellular uptake and utilization of glucose, amino acids, and lipids. Insulin also has anti-apoptotic properties. Insulin is a 2-chain, ~5.8 KDa polypeptide hormone that is produced by the β-cells of pancreatic islets. The combination of insulin and transferrin allows the concentration of serum to be reduced in many cell culture applications.

Other Insulin Information

High quality animal-free human insulin has mostly replaced blood-derived bovine insulin in cell culture and bioprocessing applications. Insulin is typically added to cell culture media at concentrations ranging from 1 to 10 milligrams per liter of medium, which is roughly 100-fold the physiological concentration. At these concentrations, Insulin can mediate a broader range of beneficial effects by interacting with both the insulin and IGF-1 (Insulin-like Growth Factor) cellular receptors. These effects include the inhibition of cell apoptosis (death) that is caused by the withdrawal of serum.

Related Products

ITSE Animal-Free

Recombinant insulin and transferrin cell culture media supplement formulated with selenium and ethanolamine for improved cell growth and productivity. Animal component free.

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References:

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  2. Breitman, T. R., et al. (1980). Replacement of serum by insulin and transferrin supports growth and differentiation of the human promyelocytic cell line, HL-60. Exp. Cell Res. 126:494-498.
  3. Kovar, J. (1986). Hybridoma cultivation in defined serum-free media: growth-supporting substances. II. Insulin, other hormones, and growth factors. Folia Biol (Praha) 32:304-310.
  4. Mainzer, C., et al. (2014). Insulin-transferrin-selenium as an alternative to foetal serum for epidermal equivalents. Intl. J. Cosmetic Sci. 36:427-435.
  5. Mamounas, M., et al. (1989). The insulin receptor as a transmitter of a mitogenic signal in Chinese hamster ovary CHO-K1 cells. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 86:9294-9298.
  6. Yen, A., and R. Duigou. (1983). Serum-free media for a human lymphocyte cell line and for pwm-stimulated peripheral blood lymphocytes: requirements for insulin, transferrin and albumin. Immunol. Lett. 6:169-174.
  7. Zhang, L., et al. (2009). Optimum combination of insulin-transferrin-selenium and fetal bovine serum for culture of rabbit articular chondrocytes in three-dimensional alginate scaffolds. Intl. J Cell Bio 2009:747016.